This Week in the 3D Printing World: Thought-Controlled 3D Printing, Ceramic Foam Ink, Flipper Mystery, and More - 3D2GO Philippines | 3D Printing Services

This Week in the 3D Printing World: Thought-Controlled 3D Printing, Ceramic Foam Ink, Flipper Mystery, and More

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This Week in the 3D Printing World: Thought-Controlled 3D Printing, Ceramic Foam Ink, Flipper Mystery, and More

University of Southampton 3D printers solve million year old flipper mystery

  • Researchers at the University of Southampton in the UK have used 3D printing to uncover facts about the plesiosaur — a creature that swam in oceans around 203 million years ago.
  • To determine the swim-path of plesiosaur flippers, Southampton researchers — alongside partners at the University of Bristol — 3D printed models based on the dimensions of a fossil skeleton.

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New Brunswick researcher to study thought-controlled 3D printing

  • New Brunswick researchers are plotting what they call the “factories of the future” by developing 3D-printing technologies they said could pave the way for the next industrial revolution.
  • The said researcher intends to take the advantages of additive manufacturing technology to the next level by developing 3D-printing methods capable of introducing new behaviours that cannot be found in conventional materials
  • He also added that he wants to “push the boundaries” of manufacturing by investigating the possibility of 3D printing powered by thought.

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Ceramic foam ink allows for 3D printing of continuously variable properties

  • Researchers from Harvard and MIT have developed a new method to 3D print bioinspired ceramic materials with independently tunable macro- and microscale porosity using a ceramic foam ink.
  • This method can be used in applications such as bone tissue scaffolds using variable stiffness, battery electrodes, filters, mechanically robust insulation, or catalyst supports that employ porosity gradients.

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Doctors in Gaza are 3D printing stethoscopes and other much-needed medical supplies

  • A team of innovative and resourceful doctors in Gaza 3D prints simple medical supplies which are not easily accessible and are high demand in the war-torn region.
  • The 3D printed stethoscopes, which cost only about $3 to make, reportedly work just as well as their branded counterparts.

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Harvard’s hybrid 3D printing method created electronic second skin

  • Using a hybrid method, researchers at Harvard University have been able to unlock a new range of materials for the technology, enabling the creation of “soft electronic devices of nearly every size and shape.”
  • Activated by “soft”, flexible electronics, this kind of second skin will enable seamless interaction between wearers and their technology, enhancing the human ability to make decisions and perform tasks.
  • The system works using a single nozzle capable of extruding TPU, silver electronic inks, and generating a soft vacuum to pick up small electronic components. For smaller parts, like LEDS, it also has a finer pin head for accurate placing.

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